Profile: Barns of North Dakota

Barns of North Dakota

The barn has been an important part of agriculture and farm life for decades. Farmers threshed grain on barn floors, stored hay in the lofts for feeding livestock, and sheltered animals in the stalls. Many types of barns can be found all over North Dakota. The culture of early immigrants dictated the style and shape of these barns. In addition, these immigrants were dependent upon the materials available to them and the climate found in North Dakota.

Picture of a barn

(a) Larimore

Picture of a barn

(b) Fargo-NDSU horse barn (no longer there)

Picture of a barn

(c) Dunseith

Picture of a barn

(d) McVille

Picture of a barn

(e) Minnewaukan

Picture of a barn

(f) Minot

Picture of a barn

(g) Velva

Picture of a barn

(h) Jamestown-State Hospital (no longer there)

Picture of a barn

(i) Oakes

Picture of a barn

(j) Northwood

Picture of a barn

(k) Michigan

Picture of a barn

(l) Manfred

Picture of a barn

(m) McCanna

Picture of a barn

(n) Langdon

Picture of a barn

(o) Watford City

Figures 122 a–o. Barns shown shown are from rural areas near: (a) Larimore, (b) Fargo-NDSU horse barn, (c) Dunseith, (d) McVille, (e) Minnewaukan, (f) Minot, (g) Velva, (h) Jamestown-State Hospital, (i) Oakes, (j) Northwood, (k) Michigan, (l) Manfred, (m) McCanna, (n) Langdon, (o) and Watford City. (The barns at Minnewaukan, McVille, McCanna, Michigan, Minot, Larimore, Northwood, Oakes, and Watford City courtesy of David Paukert, Paukert Photography; the NDSU horse barn and the barn at the State Hospital courtesy of the North Dakota Institute for Regional Studies, NDSU; the Dunseith and Velva barns courtesy of Neil Howe; the Manfred barn courtesy of Laverne Johnson; and the Langdon barn courtesy of Lorne Reimer, Cavalier, ND.)